The Anti-GirlBoss: Real World Business Advice For Equestrians

Tired of the “Boss Babe” or “Boss Mare” or “Girl Boss” monikers? We are too. Here at Heels Down Media, we get right to business sans the cheeky catch phrase. If you’re not a subscriber to the daily Heels Down Spark, you’re missing out on “The Anti-GirlBoss”, a weekly business discussion for serious equestrian entrepreneurs. Ecogold President… The post The Anti-GirlBoss: Real World Business Advice For Equestrians appeared first on Heels Down Mag.

The Anti-GirlBoss: Real World Business Advice For Equestrians

Tired of the “Boss Babe” or “Boss Mare” or “Girl Boss” monikers? We are too. Here at Heels Down Media, we get right to business sans the cheeky catch phrase.

If you’re not a subscriber to the daily Heels Down Spark, you’re missing out on “The Anti-GirlBoss”, a weekly business discussion for serious equestrian entrepreneurs. Ecogold President and Heels Down Media Founder and CEO, Patricia Da Silva answers your questions about marketing, social media promotion or business development every Wednesday in the Heels Down Spark, the daily morning newsletter that puts horses first, 24/7. 

Not a subscriber? Sign up now and get the Anti-GirlBoss delivered to your inbox.

Here’s a sampling of the advice she’s given so far.

The economic climate has forced my family to downsize and I have to sell my horse. Emotionally, I’m devastated. How do I budget in some “horse time” going forward? 

Every person grieves differently, and the first thing you should do is recognize you are going to grieve this tremendous loss. That might mean you’re not ready to get back in the saddle right away, and that’s OK. Stay in touch with your barnmates and when you’re ready, it might be worth reaching out to see if you can catch ride or exercise some horses. There are lots of ways to stay involved in the horse industry these days – a part-time job at a tack store or even volunteering at horse trials – keeps you in the environment with people who are passionate about horses like you. 

Do: Rush into anything too fast. Give yourself some time to process this loss. 

Don’t: If you sold the horse for financial reasons, don’t do anything rash to add more expenses to your plate right now. Money ebbs and flows, but this might be a good time to re-evaluate your earnings and job prospects. 

I’ve had a hard time contributing to my savings over the last year. Just too many bills. How can I get back in the habit of setting aside some money for savings? 

There’s a lot of good financial advice out there, but I’ll share some things I do personally to keep my spending in check. I have “no spend days” where on specific days, I don’t spend money on anything. (Obviously I pay bills, etc., but I don’t allow myself to buy anything ‘extra’ that day) Another idea is to pay with cash. This might sound a little antiquated, but by doing this, you can control how much you spend. If you take $100 out that day, that’s all you can spend. When it’s gone, it’s gone. 

Do: Look for easy ways to move money into savings. Sign up for auto withdrawals from your back, for example (moving money for checking into savings). Also, maybe hide your credit cards. 

Don’t: Keep finding excuses for why you need to spend. No, your horse really doesn’t need another ear bonnet. Sorry! 

I feel so burnt out from this last year, I don’t have the same passion I used to for my job. Will this get better with time? Or do I need to be proactive about rethinking my future? 

It’s time to be proactive. It’s unlikely that your situation will change or get better if you don’t do something about it. Focus on what you can control. Maybe this is the right time to pitch a new project to your boss or team, or look for a new and different challenge within your work. That can spark your creativity and give you something to be excited about. It doesn’t have to be that ‘big’ of a change to make a difference. Rearrange your office – buy new furniture. Clean out old stuff. Repaint. You’d be surprised at how refreshing that can feel. 

Do: Put something in motion. You have to be the one to move forward and get the gears going. 

Don’t: Remain passive. Things won’t improve by just waiting around.

I’m considering taking a new job but it pays less than my current job. Is it a bad idea to take a “step back” like that? 

Yes, I think it is. You need to think why you’re considering a job that pays less in the first place. Do you hate your current job so much that you’re willing to take a step back just to get out of there? If you can wait, then wait. You’ll regret it otherwise. 

As you rise up the ladder, you shouldn’t take a side-step into a job that is going to pay you less for your hard-earned experience. Ideally the path should be linear – you should be making more as you learn more skills and become more valuable. The only time I think it’s right to consider less is maybe toward the end of your career, when you have some savings and are OK to work less hours or do a job that is fun and less pressure. 

Do: Focus on building a track record of growth in your career. 

Don’t: Get stuck at a level that’s lower than your worth. Have some ambition.

My company is very flexible with young parents in my office, but seem confused by the commitment to my horses. How can I help them better understand? 

You must remember that horses are a luxury. Family is family. It’s easy for outsiders to see your commitment to horses as frivolous if they don’t know much about the sport. If you are a competitor, I would try to explain it as your commitment to a demanding sport. There are people in every office who play some kind of sport – they’re in a football or hockey league, or go golfing – it may be easier for them to understand that you are in a dedicated training program and compete in your free time. 

Not everyone is going to be open minded in a corporate environment. During the pandemic with more people working from home, I imagine it’s been easier for equestrians to squeeze in riding time. Another way to try to appeal would be to explain the effects riding has on your mental health – it’s what you do to destress from work. That’s another way to justify the time you need for it. 

But riding isn’t like having a passion for pottery. It’s a serious time commitment just like any other performance-related sport. I think that’s the easiest way for others  to understand and try to relate. 

Do: Be open and honest about your riding goals and commitments but also be fair to your employer. It’s important to have a life outside of work.

Don’t: If you’re able to multitask, great, but when you’re working, you’re working. Don’t do conference calls from horseback.


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The post The Anti-GirlBoss: Real World Business Advice For Equestrians appeared first on Heels Down Mag.